Health Outcomes

The overall aim of the Health Outcomes Axis is to optimize outcomes through the evaluation of health interventions, systems and policies. Members of this axis conduct epidemiological, biostatistical and evaluative research on the distribution and determinants of health states in the general population and clinical populations. The overall aim of the Health Outcomes Axis is to optimize outcomes through the evaluation of health interventions, systems and policies.

Members of this axis conduct epidemiological, biostatistical and evaluative research on the distribution and determinants of health states in the general population and clinical populations. By using administrative data, axis members can initiate large scale investigations on a range of subjects, such as the effectiveness of drug therapies, existing and emerging technologies, health policies, clinical informatics and trends in acute and chronic health conditions. Health Outcomes Axis investigators are at the forefront of research into patient-reported outcomes (PROs) – a topic that has stimulated this field in recent years – and are recognized experts in the methodological and biostatistical methods used to advance understanding of the effects of health conditions on individuals, their families, and society.

Recent research projects have highlighted the potential risks of new drugs, such as Cox-2 inhibitors, and resulted in predictors of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing among primary care physicians. Ongoing studies involve developing and testing community-based programs for stroke, and sex and gender differences in the development and outcomes of cardiac conditions.

Researchers in this axis have also conducted a great deal of research on clinical informatics, which provide researchers with access to a rich volume of clinical data from the implementation a new electronic health record at the MUHC. The capacity to use linked clinical and administrative data to track emerging epidemics is crucial in the wake of e-coli and c-difficile outbreaks and makes investigators at the Research Institute among the most competitive research groups in the world.