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April

April 1, 2010
We've Started

The start of construction at the Glen Campus of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) has begun. At this event, the consortium selected to develop this pivotal project was unveiled.
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March

March 17, 2010
Could regulating intestinal inflammation prevent colon cancer?

A new study by Dr. Maya Saleh and her team suggests a protein called Capsase-1 plays a crucial role in inflammation regulation and intestinal tissue repair. The team’s findings, published in Immunity, open the door to improved treatments of GI disorders.
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March 4, 2010
Low level of Vitamin D, linked to muscle fat, decreased strength in young people

A groundbreaking study by Dr. Richard Kremer published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found that a high proportion of young people had too little Vitamin D in their blood. Vitamin D deficiencies are linked to increased body fat, decreased muscle strength and other disorders.
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March 3, 2010
Research answers a curious question: Why don’t we dehydrate when we sleep?

McGill University Health Centre Researchers Charles Bourque and Eric Trudel have discovered how the body controls fluid balance during the night. Their research, published in Nature Neuroscience, shows three different groups of cells located in the hypothalamus work together to keep the body properly hydrated during waking and sleep cycles.
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February

February 25, 2010
My Tool Box program teaches patient with chronic conditions to cope better

The My Tool Box program helps patients with a chronic illness to manage their day-to-day life more effectively. The six-week program, offered free of charge to patients and their families, also helps researchers assess the impact of self-management behaviours.
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February 24, 2010
Desjardins invests in health at Lachine campus

The Lachine Hospital Foundation received a $100,000 donation from Desjardins to renovate infrastructure and acquire medical equipment for the Lachine Campus of the MUHC. The donation underlines Desjardins’ commitment to the community and to the health-care system.
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February 19, 2010
Think with your helmet!

Trauma experts from the MUHC and the Quebec Ski Areas Association (ASSQ) teamed up this winter to send an important message to skiers: “Helmets are a smart choice!” The MUHC is the first major trauma hospital to partner with the ASSQ to raise awareness of the safety benefits of ski helmets.
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February 10, 2010
McGill discovery offers hope in diabetes

A team led by Dr. Constantin Polychronakos, director of Pediatric Endocrinology at the McGill University Health Centre, shows mutations in the RFX6 gene cause a rare form of neonatal diabetes involving the complete absence of islets of Langerhans. The research, published in Nature, brings researchers one step closer to a cure for diabetes.
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February 10, 2010
New hope for diabetics: innovative treatment begins clinical trial at MUHC

A study of the new Exsulin™ peptide treatment for type 1 diabetes was begun under the direction of Dr. George Tsoukas of the McGill University Health Centre. This novel treatment attempts to stimulate the regrowth of insulin production beta cells in the pancreas.
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February 9, 2010
Getting a grip on aging

A study showing that declining handgrip strength in the elderly is a sign of imminent mortality can help healthcare clinicians target more appropriate procedures and interventions for older patients, according to Dr. Allen Huang, McGill University Health Centre geriatrician.
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February 8, 2010
Youth who self-identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual at higher suicide risk

Self identity rather than sexual behaviour is the crucial risk factor for suicide according to a study published in the Journal of American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. “A large proportion of people who are attracted to people of the same sex consider themselves heterosexual and are not at all at risk of worse mental health outcomes," says co-author Dr. Richard Montoro of the McGill University Health Centre.
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January

January 22, 2010
First-ever MUHC Career Day brought together job seekers, students and professionals

People interested in health care were invited to attend the first-ever Career Day at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) this year. The event brought together job seekers and students with MUHC healthcare professionals who answered questions and gave practical information.
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January 7, 2010
Lung Cancer Navigation Program coaches patients through complicated cancer therapy

Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of all cancers, and treatment is complex, often involving radiation, chemotherapy and surgery. To support lung cancer patients, the McGill University Health Centre created a Lung Cancer Navigation Program (LCNP), which provides each patient with the services of a “pivot nurse,” who “coaches” the individual through treatment.
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December

December 17, 2009
Cannabis and adolescence: a dangerous cocktail

A study led by the Rsearch Institute of the McGill University Health Centre Researcher Dr. Gabriella Gobbi suggests that frequent consumption of cannabis in teens can cause severe depression and anxiety, and has an irreversible effect on the brain. The study, published in Neurobiology of Disease, showed teens are more susceptible to the neurological effects of cannabis than adults.
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December 1, 2009
Celebrating 75 years of excellence

The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – the Neuro – marked its 75th anniversary. The Neuro, an internationally-acclaimed research centre, offers specialized hospital services for patients with brain-related disorders.
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November

November 2, 2009
Smokers with common auto immune disorders at higher risk for skin damage

A team led by McGill University Health Centre Researcher and Clinician Dr. Christian A Pineau found smoking is linked to skin damage in people with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disorder affecting one in every 2000 people. The study, published in The Journal Of Rheumatology, noted that symptoms of SLE can be treated, but cigarettes interfere with the effectiveness of the treatment.
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October

October 30, 2009
The Montreal Chest Institute celebrates 100 years of excellence

The Montreal Chest Institute celebrated the 100th anniversary of its opening by King Edward VII. In honour of the occasion, Queen Elizabeth II sent a letter to congratulate the Institute on its accomplishments in respiratory medicine over the last century.
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October 30, 2009
The Montreal Children's Hospital unveils cutting edge intraoperative MRI

A new intraoperative magnetic resonance (MRI) unit, the first of its kind in a Canadian pediatric hospital, went on-line in The Montreal Children’s Hospital this year. The new MRI unit gives neurosurgeons detailed, real-time views of the brain before and during surgery.
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October 15, 2009
Research shows treating HIV/AIDS with interleukin-2 is ineffective

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine concludes that treating HIV/AIDS with interleukin-2 (IL-2) is not effective. “Our results show that IL-2 has no effect on the development of AIDS or on patient survival,” says MUHC Clinician and Researcher Dr. Jean Pierre Routy, one of the study’s co-authors.
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October 7, 2009
One small step for neurons, one giant leap for nerve cell repair

A study led by Dr. David Colman, director of Montreal NeurologicaI Institute and Hospital, shows nerve cells will develop functional synapses with an artificial component. The research, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests artificial substances can help damaged nerve cells re-establish themselves – a giant step forward for scientists’ understanding of nerve cell repair.
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October 6, 2009
Major discovery opens the door to leishmania treatment

A study by McGill University Health Centre Researcher Dr. Martin Olivier, published in Science Signalling, has helped scientists understand the process of infection which results in leishmania, a deadly parasitic disease that affects 12 million people worldwide. It is hoped that the study will lead to the first treatment of the disease.
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October 1, 2009
Comparing two ways of learning

A study by McGill University Health Centre Neuroscientist Dr. Wayne Sossin and his team reveals that different patterns of training and learning lead to different types of memory formation. The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, identifies the molecular differences between spaced training (distributed over time) and massed training (at very short intervals).
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September

September 29, 2009
Study highlights HIV/AIDS challenge in American prison system

A study led by McGill University Health Centre Researcher Dr. Nitika Pai found approximately 76 per cent of prison inmates take their antiretroviral treatment while interned. However, once they leave prison, barely 15 per cent of them continue treatment. The study, published in PLoS ONE, highlights the need for effective, lifelong management of HIV/AIDS.
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September 17, 2009
McGill’s new Integrated Program in Neuroscience brings students, professionals together

The Integrated Program in Neuroscience (IPN), McGill’s new inter-departmental, inter-disciplinary neuroscience program for graduate students, will bring together students and professionals to encourage synergy among individuals focused on neuroscience.
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September 15, 2009
World Health Organization to revise tuberculosis treatment guidelines based on MUHC research

Studies co-authored by McGill University Health Centre Researcher and Clinician Dr. Dick Menzies recommend a review and adjustment of worldwide guidelines for treating tuberculosis, an infectious disease which affects more than 10 million people each year. The studies, published in PLoS Medicine, were commissioned and partly funded by the World Health Organization (WHO).
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September 1, 2009
Researchers link inflammatory diseases to increased cardiovascular risk

Patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis – two serious autoimmune disorders – are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study led by McGill University Health Centre Researcher and clinician Dr. Christian A Pineau. The study, published in The Journal of Rheumatology, was the first to link these disorders to cardiovascular diseases.
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August

August 26, 2009
Getting wired: how the brain does it?

A team of researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, led by Neuroscientist Dr. Edward Ruthazer, has found an important mechanism involved in setting up the “communications network” of connections in the brain. Their research, published in Neuron, may lead to improved treatments for adults suffering from brain injuries and a range of neurological disorders.
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August 21, 2009
New discoveries pave the way for malaria vaccine

A team led by Dr. Martin Olivier of the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre has shed light on the process underlying the severe fevers that are the hallmark of malaria, a disease that kills up to three million people annually. The team’s research, published in PLoS Pathogens, may pave the way for development of vaccine-like treatments for this devastating ailment.
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August 19, 2009
Physicians at the Neuro first in North America to offer new stent

An advanced new technology is now available to patients with large, broad neck intracranial aneurysms – a potentially deadly weakening of an artery in the brain. Physicians at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital were the first in North America to implant a specialized intracranial stent known as Silk, which re-directs the blood flow away from the aneurysm into a normal artery.
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August 12, 2009
Sound and vision share neural “code” in human brain

Sounds and images share a similar neural code in the human brain, according to a study by scientists from the Montreal Neurological Institute and the Université de Montréal. In the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers explain how the brain uses the same strategy to encode sounds as it does to encode images.
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August 11, 2009
Discovery of genetic mutation in Leigh syndrome may lead to improved diagnosis

A research team led by Dr. Eric Shoubridge, neuroscientist at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, has discovered a genetic mutation underlying late-onset Leigh syndrome, an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by the degeneration of the central nervous system. Their study, published in Nature Genetics, provides vital insights into the cell biology of this neurological disorder and will lead to the development of diagnostic and predictive tests.
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July

July 30, 2009
Mutation responsible for cystic fibrosis also involved in muscle atrophy

A study led by McGill University Health Centre Researcher Dr. Basil Petrof concludes muscle atrophy may be a primary symptom of cystic fibrosis (CF) rather than a secondary complication of the genetic disease as previously thought. The study, published in Public Library of Science – Genetics, shows the CFTR gene is present in skeletal muscles, where it plays a role in calcium regulation, leading to muscle loss.
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July 9, 2009
Toward an explanation for Crohn’s disease?

A study led by Dr. Marcel Behr of the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre  has provided new insights into how a mutation in the NOD2 gene may contribute to Crohn’s disease in some people. This research, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, may pave the way for new therapeutic approaches to Crohn's disease.
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June

June 29, 2009
Dawson revisited: scientists present groundbreaking story on psychological impact on school shooting

A study by researchers from the McGill University Health Centre and the Fernand-Seguin Research Centre of Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital found that many students and staff who needed psychological assistance after the 2006 shootings at Dawson College were reluctant to seek help due to the fear of being stigmatized. Preliminary findings of this first-of-its-kind study were presented at the 31st International Congress on Law and Mental Health.
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June 25, 2009
Research: improving treatment of patients with heart attack

A study by McGill University Health Centre Researcher and Cardiologist Dr. Thao Huynh analysed the benefits of two different approaches to treating heart attack patients: mechanically opening the blocked artery by inserting a small balloon into it (primary percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI), or giving medication to unblock it. The study, published in Circulation, concludes PCI treatment yields better results, but must be done quickly for maximum effectiveness.
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June 22, 2009
A new weapon in the war against HIV/AIDS: combined antiviral and targeted chemotherapy

A study, co-authored by MUHC Researcher and Clinician Dr. Jean-Pierre Routy, suggests HIV-AIDS could be treated through a combination of targeted chemotherapy and current Highly Active Retroviral (HAART) treatments. According to the study, published in Nature Medicine, this new therapy might destroy viruses circulating in the body as well as those “hiding” in immune system cells.
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June 18, 2009
Scientists capture the first image of memory being made

A study by a team of researchers has captured the first-ever image of a mechanism, which underlies long-term memory formation. The study, published in Science, enhances scientists’ understanding of how memory traces are created, according to co-investigator Dr. Wayne Sossin, neuroscientist at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital.
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June 4, 2009
Investigation sheds light on link between smoking and COPD

A study co-authored by McGill University Health Centre Clinician and Researcher Dr. Manuel Cosio suggests autoimmune factors and genetic predisposition explain why some smokers develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) while others do not. The study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, sheds further light on the immunological processes involved in the development of COPD – a disease described by the World Health Organization as the fourth leading cause of premature death worldwide.
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June 3, 2009
Waiting time too long for bariatric surgery

A study by McGill University Health Centre Clinician and Researcher Dr. Nicolas Christou, published in the Canadian Journal of Surgery, found the average waiting time for bariatric surgery in Canada is five years, compared with average waits of eight weeks for cancer surgery or 18 months for cosmetic surgery. This discrepancy is disturbing, because other studies have shown that bariatric surgery is a life-saving procedure.
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June 3, 2009
Montreal icons join the “Best Care for Life” campaign

Mutsumi Takahashi, chief news anchor for CTV Montreal, and hockey legend Jean Béliveau agreed to serve as co-chairs of The Best Care for Life Public Campaign. Ms. Takahashi and Mr. Béliveau will help the MUHC reach out to the Montreal community and its own employees to realize its vision of redevelopment.
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May

May 27, 2009
Discovery of dual role for proteins may lead to improved treatment for cancer, autoimmune diseases

A study by RI MUCH Researcher Dr. Maya Saleh and Researcher Dr. Phil Barker of the Montreal Neurological Institute found that while certain proteins – cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) – promote the development of cancer, they may also have the beneficial effect of activating the immune system. The findings, published in Immunity, could have a major impact on the treatment of cancer and immune dysfunction.
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May 20, 2009
Cocaine perceived as a reward by the brain

A study by Dr. Marco Leyton of the Montreal Neurological Institute demonstrates a link between cocaine and the reward circuits in the brain. The study, published in Biological Psychiatry, shows cocaine use triggers secretion of dopamine, a substance, which play a critical role in the brain’s response to reward and to addictive drugs.
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May 14, 2009
Folic acid for pregnant women reduces risk of heart defects

A study by McGill University Health Centre researchers published in the British Medical Journal shows folic acid decreases the incidence of congenital heart defects by more than six per cent. The Canadian policy of fortifying grain products with folic acid has already proved effective in preventing neural tube defects.
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May 14, 2009
Equality of the sexes? Not always when it comes to biology

A study by McGill University Health Centre Researcher Dr. Maya Saleh found women have more powerful immune systems than men. These unexpected results were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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May 11, 2009
Babies born at MUHC benefit from newborn hearing screening program

Hundreds of babies have already benefited from the McGill University Health Centre  Newborn Hearing Screening Program since it began in 2009. All babies born at the MUHC now undergo a screening test for hearing loss, and are referred to The Montreal Children's Hospital if further intervention is necessary.
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May 7, 2009
Cell’s “split personality” may lead to improved therapies for neurological diseases

Researchers at the the Montreal Neurological Institute and Université de Montreal have discovered that cells which normally support nerve cell (neuron) survival also play an important role in the death of neurons in the eye. The findings, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, may lead to improved therapies for a variety of acute and chronic neurological disorders, including glaucoma and retinal artery occlusion.
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May 1, 2009
Discovery of mechanism for cancer spread picked as discovery of the year

A discovery by McGill University Health Centre researcher Dr. Janusz Rak and his team was selected by readers of Québec Science as Discovery of the Year 2008. Dr. Rak and his team identified a fundamental mechanism by which tumour cells spread.
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April

April 14, 2009
Treat HIV earlier to decrease the risk of death

A study involving the team of Dr. Marina Klein of the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre shows the risk of death in HIV patients decreases dramatically if they start treatment earlier than officially recommended. The study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, is the first of its scope to measure the risk of death based on the progress of infection at the start of treatment.
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